porno Chinese Law | China: FAQ - The Domain Name Scam
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FAQ - The Domain Name Scam

Q: What kind of emails can I expect to receive as a victim of the Domain Name Scam?

Q: What key words within the subject line of an email should alert me to the possibility of a domain name scam?

Q: What are clues within the body of the email that can let me know that this is a scam or that the company within the email is fake?

Q: What happens if I reply to these emails?

Q: What will happen if I request that the domain names in question be protected and the organization claiming to be a “Registration Center” not allow the registration of any infringing domains?

Q: Is it a good idea to ask them to provide verification of their organization?

Q: What will happen to the domain names if I decide not to take the email seriously or register the domains?

Q: Is there a list of individuals or email addresses that are associated with these Scam emails?

Q: What should I do when I receive this scam email?

Important Documents

• Template Domain Name Scam Emails

 Actual Domain Name Scam Emails

• List of Individuals known to be involved in Domain Name Scams

• List of Websites Associated with Domain Name Scams

• List of Email Addresses Associated with Domain Name Scams

Q: What kind of emails can I expect to receive as a victim of the Domain Name Scam?

A: There are three common emails within the Domain Name Scam:

1.       An organization in China is interested in some available domain names (typically .hk, .cn, .tw), which happen to be a variation of a trademark or domain name that you or your company own. In a few days the other party will register these domains, unless you react.

2.       A reminder will prompt you to renew a domain name that looks very similar to your own but is altered in some small way to be an entirely different domain.

3.       A separate renewal reminder will ask you to restore a domain name that you have registered with another registrar.

Q: What key words within the subject line of an email should alert me to the possibility of a domain name scam?

A: In terms of company names, domain scam emails in China often appear to come from organizations with titles like:

·         China Domain Name Registration Center

·         Asian Domain Registration Service In China

·         The Department Of Registration Service In China

and popular words used in the email subject lines include;

·         "urgent brand registration confirmation"

·         "Domain dispute and protection",

·         "Asia, Cn, Hk domain name and Internet Keyword"

·         "Notice of Brand name registration".

Q: What are clues within the body of the email that can let me know that this is a scam or that the company within the email is fake?

A: Domain name scam emails will frequently request that you forward information to a superior (e.g. your CEO). The email will contain details of another company’s attempt to register domain names within China that infringe upon your organization’s trademarks. Also, the emails will stress that the matter is urgent and if you fail to take action a third party will immediately register domains similar to yours.   

Q: What happens if I reply to these emails?

 

A: Often they will send you a quote for registering the domain names and then ask you to sign the quote and return it to them. If you ignore this email they will often call to pressure you to take action and then set an urgent deadline for you to adhere to.

 

Q: What will happen if I request that the domain names in question be protected and the organization claiming to be a “Registration Center” not allow the registration of any infringing domains?

A: The individual responsible for the initial email will send a quick response, alerting you that they have attempted to contact the organization who is working to take advantage of your trademark. They will incorrectly tell you that this organization will not alter their plans of registering the domain names, and the only option you are left with is to register the Chinese domains as you have priority as the trademark owner.

Q: Is it a good idea to ask them to provide verification of their organization?

A: It can’t hurt to ask for verification but most commonly you will receive an email stating that the information you are requesting is confidential and therefore information that they cannot provide.

Q: What will happen to the domain names if I decide not to take the email seriously or register the domains?

A: The scam email will make is sound as if the domain in question are only days away from being registered and taken away from you. In a number of cases, however, the domain names with the scam email stayed available for years after the scammer threatened they would be registered.

Q: Is there a list of individuals or email addresses that are associated with these Scam emails?

A: Please click on the following link (Domain Name Scam Contact Details) to look up detailed contact information of individuals associated with sending such emails.

Also, at the following link (Domain Name Scam Email Addresses) you will find a list of all emails associated with this scam, you may block all the included emails or use this list to track down the address associated with an email you have received.

Q: What should I do when I receive this scam email?

A: You may always contact our law firm, specializing in IP law in China, by emailing mail@lehmanlaw.com. Additionally, you may report scamming like this to your local authorities (use Google Search to find them). You should also report the suspicious behavior to your current, and legitimate, domain registrar. If you do feel that it is important to register a domain name that is mentioned in one of these emails, by all means register it, but use another registration source than the one provided in the scam email.

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